Theodora Portrait Design

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I am a Misfit

Terri BleekerComment

I'm sitting here trying to figure out what to say about MisfitCon and my eyes are welling with tears. The emotions are coming back to the surface. And I'm pretty sure the coffee show owner doesn't know what to make of the lady crying over her coffee.

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You wouldn't think something called MisfitCon would evoke emotion, but how wrong you would be. I vividly remember the conversation with my husband about finally coming to Misfit. The emotions immediately came to the surface. I felt even in that conversation, not truly knowing what I was signing up for, that Fargo wasn't just going to be a destination, It was going to be a turning point in a journey I had been on. Turns out I was right.

I loved the buzzing chatter on the bus during the conference opening night, but it was walking into Ecce the next morning that I started to feel why I needed to be here. In Fargo, North Dakota. Amongst the breakfast chatter a feeling of community washed over me. This is something I had hidden from but needed for so long. I've hidden from community in my field because I've been burned. I've also hidden out of fear of not being enough. The dreaded imposter syndrome. And there I was. In Fargo. A thousand miles from home. And I had walked into my community. People from around the country. From all different fields.

I could tell you about the talks. A-MAZ-ING. I could tell you about the food. D-LISH. I could tell about the amazing decor and thoughtfulness that goes into every detail of the gallery. Oh how I wish these people would come decorate my home with such beautiful trash treasures. I could tell you about the healing conversations I had. Holly cow! I could seriously write a book about those 3 1/2 days. But that's for another conversation. Or twenty.

What I'll say is that I have never seen a love letter to a community like I witnessed in Fargo. AJ, Melissa, Nichole, and the other volunteers - your love letter is one of the most beautiful experiences I've had. It wasn't just something neat to tell people about. In fact it insanely difficult to put into words. What it is, though, is a life changing experience.

This woman, who struggled through awkwardness all through high school. Who has fought to be comfortable in her own skin. Who came to Fargo let go is so humbled and insanely proud to be called a Misfit.